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Thread: Best way to get rid of instep pressure

  1. #1

    Best way to get rid of instep pressure

    Hi Dave,

    I seem to have a bit of instep pressure on my left foot. What would be the best way to alleviate that? I don't really want to mess with thinning out the foot bed as my last fitter got them balanced out for me. Sanding the bottoms to lower them will just mess all of that work up. Would this be a liner modification, or are there things you can to do the shell as well?

    Just an FYI. I skied with my bottom two buckles fairly undone, so I know buckling the boot too tight isn't causing the problem..

    Thank you..

    Toby

  2. #2
    Home Sweet Home Ski Patrol daveski7's Avatar
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    Anything you would do to stretch the instep area gets washed out by the buckles so that is not an option. The few options are 1) make sure you bang your heel real hard to get into the back of the boot before buckling to get that instep far back. 2) before buckling, pull up on the tongue a bit, this will create a tad more volume, and 3)make sure you are maintaining that shin/tongue pressure as any unneccessary up movements will put direct pressure in that area.

    You did already take out the heel lifts correct? This in itself should have created more space. If so, it might take a couple of days to get rid of the artificial forward lean and create it all on your own. The liner should pack out a bit in that area, it might take a few days, and as you said, buckle lightly. Let me know if any of this works, Dave
    When you are winning, don't let up. When you are losing, don't give up.

  3. #3
    Hi Dave,

    Yes I did remove the heel lift, and so far its giving me good results. Since the left foot is a bit bigger than the right, this seems to be causing a bit of the problem. I've also noticed that sometimes when I tighten the instep buckle, the bottom of my feet cramp up. Therefore I've gotten into the habit of pretty much leaving my buckles loose with the exception of my booster strap at top. Interestingly I don't seem to be experiencing any such issues with my right boot. (knock on wood).

    your right though, maybe skiing for another couple days without that heel lift will break the liner in more and resolve some of this. Its worth a shot. I will also try tightening the instep buckle again and see..

    Thanks Dave!

    Toby
    Last edited by Toby; February 25th, 2012 at 10:26 AM.

  4. #4
    Home Sweet Home Ski Patrol daveski7's Avatar
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    Also Toby, second buckle down needs to be snug also to keep the foot from moving forwards and thus creating pressure on the instep also. Again, without seeing your actual foot and boot it can be just speculation but I am trying my darndest to help you with your boot issues. If none of this works, I hate to say it, but you may have to re-evaluate the whole boot situation. Give it a shot and get back to me. Respectfully, Dave
    When you are winning, don't let up. When you are losing, don't give up.

  5. #5
    I am trying my darndest to help you with your boot issues. If none of this works, I hate to say it, but you may have to re-evaluate the whole boot situation. Give it a shot and get back to me. Respectfully, Dave
    Hi Dave,

    I really appreciate your efforts too. So thank you very much! You've actually given me some good direction. But your most likely right about having to re-evalute my boots. My friends friend used to race and stated that my boots will never be comfortable because they were designed for racing. I kind of assumed they weren't since they aren't plug boots.

    having said that, do you have any idea why the bottom of my foot would cramp up when tightening the second buckle down? The only thing that makes sense is that by tightening the buckle, it pulls me just slightly too far aft of the bed and not allowing me to rest straight on top of it as it was molded. Any other reasons you can think of?

    Toby

  6. #6
    Home Sweet Home Ski Patrol daveski7's Avatar
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    Toby, let me be honest with you. You are very passionate about skiing and you more than wear it on your sleeve. Your determination and willingness to learn and improve is amazing. That said, I personally feel that your boots may be inappropriate for you on numerous levels. They should not be more work than improving your skiing, however they can hold you back. I think that if it is as important to you as it seems, I would start over with the boot situation and start from square one. Instead of trying to make something just work for you and spending numerous hours of discomfort, get something that is closer to "out of the box" fit and just a tweak or two and voilat. See a fitter, I remember giving you a name a while back in your area, tell him everything and be honest. Recreational racer, but more impoortantly you need a boot that you can ski in all day. Remember this Toby, you date a ski but you MARRY a boot. Get it done right, you owe it to yourself. Respectfully, Dave
    When you are winning, don't let up. When you are losing, don't give up.

  7. #7
    I have my own seat in the pub Bushido Princess's Avatar
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    I am not very knowledgeable but if you permit me I would like to add my two cents. What I have also found, Toby, is sometimes you just need to give it time. If you made a big change like taking out your heel lifts, you may feel some discomfort for a few days. Your feet need to acclimate to the new position. When Brother would change something in my boots he would always have me ski for a couple of weeks before being willing to change anything else. If you change your setup with every symptom every time you feel something you will only mess yourself up terribly. I would see if the feeling continues to persist after a week or two or see if it just works itself out. I also found that stretching and massaging thoroughly every day before and after I ski makes a HUGE difference in pains and cramps. Sometimes it's not the boot at all, it's just that your muscles are tight. If my hamstrings and calf muscles are too tight, I really feel it in my feet when I have my boots on. So I say take your time and slow down your changes in your boots and give your feet time to adjust. That may solve a lot of your issues.

  8. #8
    Hi BP and Dave,

    Good advice from both of you. If things don't work out with all the suggestions given, I will definitely see a boot shop. I found a local shop to me and so far he seems decent and a very nice guy. If I understood him correctly he was a boot technician for Phil maier. Hopefully that means something good. I might even just stop in and discuss things with him this week, even if he doesnt make changes just to gather information for the future.

    Thanks Guys and Gals!

    Toby

  9. #9
    I have my own seat in the pub Bushido Princess's Avatar
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    If he really was working with Phil Mahre that could be a good sign. I would find out if that claim is true though. The Mahres were the best in the business but that was quite a while ago and boot technology has come a ways since then. Also if someone is making a false claim like that to get your business I would want to know. And just because he might have done something for Phil does not guarantee that he is right for you. Phil is Phil and Toby is Toby. I don't want to discourage in any way from finding an excellent bootfitter. Other than your boots your bootfitter is the most important thing in your skiing bag I think. All I am saying is just make sure that you get opinions from others that are more current and that you can actually talk to if you can. And perhaps he is working with Phil now. I am sure Phil still skis. But either way, since you have issues with your feet, just make sure that he really is a knowledgeable, reputable and honest bootfitter. He might be the perfect one for you or he might not be. And remember you don't need the the best bootfitter in the world who works with all the world class racers. That may be the best bootfitter for you or it may not be. There are some people whom I know who have gone to bootfitters like that who work with a lot of racers and are extremely well known and respected and they are wonderful bootfitters and very good at what they do. But they were just not the right fit for these people and they ended up going with someone else. So even if it's the best fitter in the world on paper, make sure it's the best fitter in the world for Toby.

  10. #10
    Hi BP.

    I was going to mention something about being cautious with boot fitters but was afraid I would go on my "I hate most bootfitters in Seattle" rant. . So I appreciate your thoughtful approach to the issue. I'm also thinking I may have discovered part of the problem. One is that most first time or even seasoned skiers know very little about how to actually express themselves correctly to the fitter. They can say, this hurts, or that doesn't feel right, but outside of that there are held to the mercy of the fitter. I'm sure its equally frustrating for the fitter as well. Now that I have more experience I can engage myself more productively with them unlike in times past. Its also why we as skiers must learn all we can about our own feet and help break that negative cycle.

    The other thing I realized is at least 3, and perhaps 4 of the fitters I've dealt with were involved with racing in one form or another. One I know raced world cup in the 60s, before it was called world cup. So my thinking is that while they are probably excellent with the racing crowd, one size doesn't always fit all. I think when people focus on one main aspect of the sport for so long they tend to become narrow minded in their approach to other things. Just my two cents but either way I will definitely be cautious.

    Thanks for your comments.

    Toby
    Last edited by Toby; February 26th, 2012 at 11:19 AM.

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