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Thread: Never, ever buy twintips without demoing...

  1. #1

    Never, ever buy twintips without demoing...

    I am 6 for 9 on purchasing skis without demoing. The 3 misses have *all* been twintips.

    Weird, huh?

    The story of the current dud: Herself was in love with the graphics on these CoreUPT Oneirics, and decided that 88mm was sufficient float for her in a frontside Western ski. She ordered them. I decided to put Railflex on them. No fuss no muss, right?

    They arrived. First, it was hard to tell front from back - the topsheets were *not* on correctly and there was a visible 4mm slip of one topsheet relative to the ski. Not enough to fuss over returning, but definitely a disappointment.

    One of the logos is printed on the tail of one ski and the other on the tip of the other, so I had to spend a good half hour matching up tip and tail widths to establish which tip was which, where the center of surface was. The topsheets had little golden arrows printed on them - I suspect *after* the topsheet was glued, since they matched up nicely with what I measured. One hurdle over, right?

    Flip the ski over and look the bases and edges. Factory grind looks pretty good. Except they put a 2* base bevel on them. I decided to wax the bases anyway. (Bad choice, but we'll come to that later).

    For those of you who have used warm waxes on factory new bases, you know how easily they soak in. Well these didn't. At all. The bases were as bad as, if not worse than, old Salomon Snoblades (with the greenish extruded bases). Aaargh.

    Well, long story short, she was excited to try them anyway.

    Half an hour after she put them on she was back at the lodge in tears. So of course I had to set them to my boots and try them, right?

    Slowest bases I have *ever* been on. Reasonable longitudinal flex but barely adequate in torsion, barely adequate to hold someone 40 pounds lighter than me that is. Edge feel so vague one has to hunt for the big toe side, forget about feeling the little toe side. Sidecut feels badly centered on the ski - too far forward - almost like someone took a Jr. 140mm ski and stuck 20 cm of tail on it.

    Personally, I think these are a complete nonstarter and waste of time and money. Except she likes the graphics too much. So I did a bit of edge work. And I shifted the bindings 3 cm back from factory spec. And I went nuts with the brush and wax cycles. Wish her luck with one more try. Personally I wish she'd just list them on Craigslist and be done.

  2. #2
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    Wow, one of the worst ski reviews I've ever read. Sounds like the Yugo of skis. I agree, Craigslist sounds like to way to go. Cut your losses, get a quality ski, apply graphics of choice.

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  3. #3
    That Yugo looks sweet! $3,990?! Are you kidding me???



    In my wife's six years of skiing she has had 2 seasons in which she took giant leaps forward in ability level (not counting her first season which could be considered a different kind of giant leap forward from not skiing at all). The first time was in 2011 and the second time was this year. In 2011 she was on a twintip which was the Solomon Lady. I think those skis get a lot of credit for the leap forward that she took that year. So I just wanted to say that I don't think they're all bad. For skiers of extremely high turning ability I suspect there are probably less that would work well than there would be for a learning skier.

    In general I would agree with the OP. Something is going wrong in this sport when skiers with actual skiing skill are less interesting to people than skiers that just imitate snowboarders in their approach to the sport. A few years ago if you walked into a mainstream ski shop that had a lot of skis you could hardly see anything that wasn't a twintip. Nordica was the only brand that I saw that had a reasonable amount of non-twintips. When I decide that it makes more sense to ski down the hill ass-first I guess I'll buy one, but until then...

  4. #4
    Home Sweet Home Skier Village Coach mastersracer's Avatar
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    Comprex, It sounds like the problems were more to do with manufacture, than the type of ski they were; slow bases, 2* base edge angle, misaligned topsheets have nothing to do with their bing twin tips and everything to do with how they were made and finished.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by mastersracer View Post
    Comprex, It sounds like the problems were more to do with manufacture, than the type of ski they were; slow bases, 2* base edge angle, misaligned topsheets have nothing to do with their bing twin tips and everything to do with how they were made and finished.
    MR, you're absolutely correct - the problems listed are not problems inherent to this type of ski. Actually, let me change that, they are not problems that should be inherent to this type of ski.

    I've never even thought - let alone thought to imply - that there was a causation "twintips therefore bad".

    This thread was created to indicate my surprise that there was an apparent correlation. Remember the old saying "correlation doesn't mean causation"? i.e. just because two things happened together doesn't mean one caused the other. This thread was written to indicate my surprise that these things appear to happen together.

    Previous duds were from better-established companies (*cough*Fischer, Elan*cough*) - it would have been easy to dismiss this instance as symptomatic of CoreUPT but not only can I *not* do that (that would be leaping to conclusions), but I have to consider that something else could be going on.

    My best candidate for 'something else that could be going on' is "Neither the mfg. nor the retail-level seller really care about having these types of skis finished to a high level, because they expect their primary users to destroy them fast". You'll pardon me, I hope, for not wishing to run that conjecture through a test protocol - I really don't want to ski anything like this ever again.
    Last edited by comprex; February 3rd, 2014 at 04:31 PM.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by '9' View Post
    That Yugo looks sweet! $3,990?! Are you kidding me???

    the irony is that they were $5700+ in the home market - directly comparable to Ford Escort prices at the time, and they drove better than the Escorts - the company took a large hit to establish itself in a different market, and there were 8month+ waiting lists for delivery.

  7. #7
    Know all the neighbours by name Skier Village Poet Winks's Avatar
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    You've purchased nine sets of skis...?

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Winks View Post
    You've purchased nine sets of skis...?
    Far more than that. Nine sets without demoing - unless there's some I forgot about.

  9. #9
    Know all the neighbours by name Skier Village Poet Winks's Avatar
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    How many all together? I've purchased 4 sets of skis....

  10. #10
    Home Sweet Home Skier Village Coach mastersracer's Avatar
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    I have rarely demoed skis before buying, but I don't spend a lot most of the time, either. Dozens purchased. Some were repeats, though, so demoing would have been silly.

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