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Thread: Ricks Training drill (hands placed above knees) to promote ridding of A-framing

  1. #1

    Ricks Training drill (hands placed above knees) to promote ridding of A-framing

    Here is my first experiences with Ricks Hands above knees drill. Without poles, you place your hands right above your knees, then while doing turns you use your hands to help assist rolling both knees as equally as possible towards the inside of the turn. This helps to eliminate the Famous A-frame stance that many hold.

    On my first try it felt abit awkward for sure. After about two or three runs it started to feel more natural. I knew my turns could be a bit blocky at times, but really had no idea just HOW blocky they were until I tried this drill. My turns now are starting to feel smoother and faster, and my transitions have improved some. I also noticed this drill naturally made my turns smaller, telling me it places more weight on the front of the boots and or skis. I suspect I had not been pressuring my tongues consistently beforehand. This new movement also seems to promote a better sense of bio mechanics as my knees don't feel as sore as I have experienced in the past. Carving also seems to be enhanced. Overall I found it a very simple drill on easy terrain and really improved my skiing overall. Very happy with this drill!

    Toby

    PS. as an after thought, I have been working on angulation as well, so perhaps the combination of that and the hands on knees drill has lessened my knee soreness.
    Last edited by Toby; February 28th, 2014 at 12:04 AM.

  2. #2
    I have my own seat in the pub Bushido Princess's Avatar
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    Toby, that is great! Congrats on that drill.

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    thanks BP....

  4. #4
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    I've also seen this done where you cross your wrists between the knees with the right hand available to push the left knee left and the left hand pushing the right knee right. The drills are designed to eliminate the habitual pushing of the inside knee against the outside knee, thus blocking that knee from moving adequately.

  5. #5
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    Toby, glad to hear the drill worked so well for you. Thanks for posting your experience with it.
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  6. #6
    Moderator Snow Sport InstructorSkier Village Coach LiquidFeet's Avatar
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    Rolling the knees was my mantra on my trip west, concluded last night around midnight. I did not do the hands part as described above, but I did roll the knees in different ways for six days. I think this is in muscle memory now; let's see how New England ice tests my precision.

    The goal I chose was to roll the new inside knee down the hill FASTER, FASTER... seeing how short a radius I could carve on my new skis (FX84s) without pivoting them at the top of the turn. These are not slalom skis; the turn radius is maybe 17 meters.

    I did this dramatic knee roll facing the trees at the end of the old turn...
    I did it facing downhill with the old turn's "counter" still in effect...
    I did it dropping my whole self downhill as a unit (inclining) before angulating over the outside ski....
    I did it dropping my new inside hip downhill into almost-immediate angulation.
    I did it a lot.
    This practice got the round turn thing going big time for me, just as with Toby.
    It worked beautifully in freshly fallen cement on the last day. I'm calling this OLR.

    I also did ILE, extending off the new outside ski's LTE and immediately rolling its knee downhill to start the new turn. Along with this extension I dramatically pivoted that ski around to see how short a radius I could create. VERY SHORT indeed!! Pivoting, or fast steering if you prefer, played a big part in making these short radius turns so short. They wore me out. This whole process of playing with the knee-roll options let me know where the short radius possibilities are with all-mountain skis.

    I wish the off-piste snow had been more user-friendly while my group was there (Sun Valley). I crept into the ungroomed every day to check it out but traversed out each time. Breakable crust I think they call that stuff. Parts of that stiff snow broke off in "plates," scattering into lumps that from a great distance looked like bumps. They did not resemble the bumps I know here in New England; ours are hard (icy) and smooth. I'll take smooth ice bumps any day over those dangerous looking piles of broken crust. Think: broken white dishes piled up, with some golf balls filling in the gaps.

    Anyhoo, I'm now in love with rolling that downhill knee. Works wonders; but for super shorties extend off the new outside leg and roll its knee fast while getting the new inside leg outa the way.
    Last edited by LiquidFeet; March 12th, 2014 at 03:13 PM.

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    Try thinking about your knee movement beginning with rolling the feet.

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    Furnished the apartment Skier Village Coach
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
    Try thinking about your knee movement beginning with rolling the feet.

    I would try to get a mental picture of tipping the arch to engage the ski evenly. Inversion ,eversion=rolling the feet. Encourage the knees to come along with the feet.

  9. #9
    Moderator Snow Sport InstructorSkier Village Coach LiquidFeet's Avatar
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    Well, for my purposes, at the speed I'm rolling the knee, there wouldn't be time to roll the ankle separately first.
    I don't want the ankle to "encourage" the knee to roll over. I'm using some bigger muscles up above to get that knee waaaaaay over, waaaaay fast. Ankle just won't do that.

    For someone beginning to get familiar with rolling the knee, starting with ankle roll and letting that ankle lead the knee into its roll-over should work. Good point.

  10. #10
    Furnished the apartment Skier Village Coach
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    Rolls the knees with the ankle. Begin with the ankles and move the knees with them. By encourage I mean physically manipulate them to tip . Afrer a while they will move in concert. Tipping movements begin with the ankle. I has a good range of movement to enable tipping and begins the cascade of body activity that moves us into the turn.

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