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Pushing the feet forward at transition - Page 4
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Thread: Pushing the feet forward at transition

  1. #31
    Still unpacking boxes Skier Village Coach TDK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamt View Post
    If you focus on tipping the inside foot and lifting the inside hip to the point where it lightens the inside pressure you will get both hip and knee angulation. Just increase it progressively until it is time to reduce again. IMO whether the knee or hip angulation comes first is mostly a mental cue. They should happen together. However, I think that most hip dumpers never really use knee angulation. If you tip from the feet it feels very strange to hip dump.

    Regarding the original topic of this thread I view it as simply a way to move the body to where it needs to be in the future rather than a fixed position right now. The simplest example is a hockey stop. You can twist the skis 90 degrees and then start to incline in a direction opposite to the movement direction. The other way is to immediately start to incline before you twist the skis, and this means backwards. You will be faster to reach a powerful hockey stop.
    Inclining backwards.... this is pretty unorthodox advice hahahaa. Could also be viewed as "being in the back seat" or "toilet seat" skiing. But herein lies the secret to powerful tipping and skiing with high edge angles hip scraping the snow. Think Bode or Byggmark. Stay low through transition and extend as your skis start to turn into the fall line recentering as you regain pressure. Some claim that you should be balanced all the time. This is not true. Its really all about thinking and acting ahead. Just like walking.
    Carving - let the skis turn you, not you turning your skis

  2. #32
    Moderator Snow Sport InstructorSkier Village Coach LiquidFeet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDK View Post
    Inclining backwards.... this is pretty unorthodox advice hahahaa. Could also be viewed as "being in the back seat" or "toilet seat" skiing. But herein lies the secret to powerful tipping and skiing with high edge angles hip scraping the snow. Think Bode or Byggmark. Stay low through transition and extend as your skis start to turn into the fall line recentering as you regain pressure. Some claim that you should be balanced all the time. This is not true. Its really all about thinking and acting ahead. Just like walking.
    TDK, are you healing well?

  3. #33
    Still unpacking boxes Skier Village Coach TDK's Avatar
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    LF - its been a long recovery but I see light at the end of the tunnel (shoulder injury). What bothers me more than getting into shape is getting injured again.... not a good thing. But thats part of it. Dealing with injury and facing the dangers with new perspectives.
    Carving - let the skis turn you, not you turning your skis

  4. #34
    Looking for a house Snow Sport Instructor
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    You can't dwell on past injuries or you will never ski well again. As you noted in Post 31, you cannot maintain balance. You have to recover balance. That's what skiing is all about. With injury in mind, you try too hard to maintain balance. Here's a recent post I made elsewhere regarding injuries I've returned to skiing from:


    I separated my breastbone from one side of my ribcage when I was in my mid-20s when some jerk ran into me while I was teaching my daughters to ski and I fell onto his upturned ski edge.

    I fractured my skull in 1975 when I ran into a four-person chair that didn't budge.

    I got a fracture-dislocation of my right shoulder while at the PSIA National Academy at Snowbird in 1981.

    Ruptured my left Achilles tendon the Saturday after Thanksgiving, my third day of skiing for the season, in 1995. No more skiing until the next November, and it was the best snow year we'd had in a decade.

    The last three all included a sledride. I kind of liked the middle ride because my humerus being located somewhere near my spine made it impossible for me to lie down, so the patroller enlisted a really cute blonde colleague to sit in the back of the sled and hold me upright while he hauled both of us down to the truck that took me to the medical center. She made the lumps and bumps easier to handle.

    Of course, that was six years ago. Since then I added



    In December 2011 when run down by another skier. And last spring I tweaked my left MCL, so after a few days of rest I skied the rest of the season with a brace.



  5. #35
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    TDK, somehow I missed the news you'd been injured. While racing?

    Yikes, KB. Testimony to how much you must love this sport, to just keep coming back for more.
    YOUR SKI COACH - Bringing world class skills to the recreational skier

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  6. #36
    Moderator Snow Sport InstructorSkier Village Coach LiquidFeet's Avatar
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    Kneale, you are a tough trooper!

  7. #37
    Looking for a house Snow Sport Instructor
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    I've been described somewhat less favorably by some of my family

  8. #38
    My horse knows his own way home Snow Sport Instructor SMJ's Avatar
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    I read a book "Peak Performance Principles for High Achievers" and he states that if you really have a passion for something and put serious effort and time into it, you'll come across many people who think you're "obsessed" or will disagree with your effort and time. Family members in particular. You need to ignore that and do what you're driven to do.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/088...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
    I need to be a conqueror, a liberator of my potential, kept prisoner all these years.

  9. #39
    Moderator Snow Sport InstructorSkier Village Coach LiquidFeet's Avatar
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    Boy I like that message. Can you bottle and sell it?

  10. #40
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
    Boy I like that message. Can you bottle and sell it?
    Smerf Blue Koolaid on your grocer's shelves NOW!

    Nice way to put it Smidge )

    To the original thread, it sounds a bit like the way I used to load up the tails at the end of turn. A lot more fore/aft movement back then. In my mind I was loading-the-spring. Opening at the ankles driving into he back an heel f the boot then closing the ankles quickly at transition and letting the skis leave the snow while the energy in my core released as the counter unwound into the pivot. Continue closing the ankles and getting the hip forward and ready to dig the tips into the new turn. Don't know if I was doing anything sanctioned but it sure felt fun! I throw that old fore/aft thing at the E88s and POW. Very powerful tail on them. It never felt like a back seat position nor out-of-balance just a quick move to load some stored energy in the tails.
    Last edited by mtguide1; October 18th, 2014 at 11:29 PM.
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

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