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Thread: Pushing the feet forward at transition

  1. #11
    Hi Gary,

    its clear the transitions are a bit over my head still, but hopefully sometime next year I will start to work on those more..

    Thank you.,...
    Toby

  2. #12
    Looking for a house Snow Sport Instructor
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    Toby, some inclination (moving in the turn direction) is required as the ankle joints open. The skis move somewhat forward, in the direction they were pointed as you end the previous turn, so that they go more out and around while the skier moves more inside the arc of the turn. As Garryz notes, opening the ankle joints is an overlooked part of the extension/flexion process. Many skiers more often extend and flex the knee joints without involving the ankle joints.

  3. #13
    opening the ankle joints is an overlooked part of the extension/flexion process. Many skiers more often extend and flex the knee joints without involving the ankle joints.
    Hi Kneale,

    That is a good point Kneale. I've been working this year on laterally moving my ankles, but didn't have it in my mind to train using them fore and aft. I will try to work on that too this year. I admit lateral ankle flexion is simply amazing. The turns are smoother and you can make them tighter without using steering like I normally would.


    Thank you,,,,

    Toby

  4. #14
    My horse knows his own way home Snow Sport Instructor SMJ's Avatar
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    Finally got back on my carving skis after a few days on the Soul7's. This worked much better on them, particularly re-engaging the tips after the retraction. Probably due to the fact that the Soul7's have rocker and the tips never engage at all.
    I need to be a conqueror, a liberator of my potential, kept prisoner all these years.

  5. #15
    Home Sweet Home Skier Village Coach mastersracer's Avatar
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    Soul 7s, if they are anything like my bent chetlers, are like fat SL skis with extra added to the tip and tail. The 'tips' don't engage, but the point where the rocker ends and the camber begins does.

  6. #16
    My horse knows his own way home Snow Sport Instructor SMJ's Avatar
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    True, but I don't think I get enough edge angle on them to really feel that. I felt the engagement much more on the Magnums.
    I need to be a conqueror, a liberator of my potential, kept prisoner all these years.

  7. #17
    Home Sweet Home Skier Village Coach mastersracer's Avatar
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    Pretend they are SL skis on hard pack. Of course you need to work harder laterally to get them on edge, but I'd be surprised if you couldn't pop off some quick little SL turns if you want to. It makes the groomer between powder shots that much more fun.

    Until I got the Atomics, I didn't realize that rockered skis with underfoot camber could ski so well because all the young bucks just wiggle their butts down the slope ont the tails of the skis with their hands in their crotch.

  8. #18
    My horse knows his own way home Snow Sport Instructor SMJ's Avatar
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    Oh definitely mr, and I do and they love it - it's just that a better skier could do it better.

    A carving ski just makes it easier. I want to find a deal on a pair of 165 WC SL's for next year. Will never stop regretting selling those Blizzard Magnesium's to Bazzer.
    I need to be a conqueror, a liberator of my potential, kept prisoner all these years.

  9. #19
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    The ankle recloses by two processes. One being the lengthening of the outside leg as mentioned and the other being by the femurs turning in the hip sockets.

    I personally feel no need to push or pull my feet fore/aft at turn transition except in extreme cases. Most of my turns are a combination of cross over/cross under turns for everyday recreational skiing. I feel most of the time that my pelvis is aft of my feet at edge change.

  10. #20
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pierre View Post
    The ankle recloses by two processes. One being the lengthening of the outside leg as mentioned and the other being by the femurs turning in the hip sockets.

    I personally feel no need to push or pull my feet fore/aft at turn transition except in extreme cases. Most of my turns are a combination of cross over/cross under turns for everyday recreational skiing. I feel most of the time that my pelvis is aft of my feet at edge change.
    Good observation, Pierre. And it doesn't matter much which type of transition you're using, the pelvis generally finds itself aft of the feet at some point during the transition. It's because the prior turn required the inside knee to be flexed, just a part of the tipping on edge process that results in inside tip lead. That leading inside foot is what will become the new outside foot for the new turn, so something has to be done to get it back underneath you. A cross over transition is useful because it solves that issue the quickest, by means of extending the new outside leg the earliest in the transition cycle, which conveniently pulls the pelvis back up over the feet, which allows the front of the ski to be engaged the soonest in arc to arc turns.

    In other types of transitions, OLR, cross through, retraction, etc, the pelvis trails the feet even more drastically during the transition cycle, because extension of the new inside knee happens more slowly. During the course of a retraction transition the new inside knee is actually flexed more, which drops the pelvis even further behind the feet.

    Something new to ponder:
    Something else that helps recenter the new outside foot under the pelvis during the transition is something I've coined "pelvic shift". It's a term I personally created to describe and teach a move that quickly gets the pelvis in the proper rotational position for the new turn. You basically drive your new inside hip (downhill hip) forward as you execute your transition. Doing that eliminates any and all counter that was being used in the prior turn, which at the same time pulls the old inside foot back, eliminating which tip lead existed. Presto, the pelvis instantly finds back over top of the new outside foot, right where in needs to be to execute a powerful and precise initiation of the new turn.
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