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Thread: Senior Specialist Program Development

  1. #1
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    Senior Specialist Program Development

    I return to the Village hat in hand. Seems like everyone in PSIA-NRM wants a senior specialist program but there was no movement. Being a skier and a senior, it is a subject near to my heart so I raised my hand and volunteered to manage program development and roll out. The last time I volunteered for anything someone handed me a rifle and a bag full of green clothes. As you all know, I am a slow learner.

    I came here because this town is loaded with tons of talent and experience and more than a little bit of sanity. I would be forever grateful for anyone's thoughts on the unique challenges come with teaching seniors, anything from deeply technical biomechanics, to marketing/pricing/packaging, program structure, terrain development, tuning, gear selection...anything.

    I do have an Instructor's Manual from PSIA-W and our executive director sent out feelers to other regions to see what has already been done. If anyone on here IS a certified Senior Specialist in another region, I would really like to chat about that experience with you.

    Thanks...M1
    Last edited by mtguide1; October 16th, 2014 at 11:49 PM. Reason: my usual typos
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

  2. #2
    Living in a van down by the river Ski Patrol
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    Personally,

    I would reach out to the notable coaches, working branded 'senior' or 'boomer' oriented camps and talk to them directly. As this is terra nova for PSIA, I'd ooh to the active innovators working this end of the street outside of PSIA.

    John Clendenin, Bob Barnes (Winter park bumps for boomers guy), PJ Jones (if he still runs the off-piste camp for seniors), heck..try to track down Lito. Honestly, I bet they'd all be happy to actually talk directly with you and be very generous with their ideas.

  3. #3
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    Hey Superbman! Thanks to much for the direction. Now that I am actually digging into the seniors' scene I am finding tons of clubs all over the world. My "people to call" list is already at 52. I agree that seniors' are terra nova for PSIA but I would add it seems that way for the entire industry. If you browse a copy of SKI magazine you might get the impression it is illegal for people over 25 to ski. I am really looking forward this.

    One of the areas I find lacking in what PSIA material I do have is the adaptation of "acceptable" technique to fit a seniors needs. It is not an "adaptive" teaching model in the traditional sense that PSIA approaches it, but there is a need to take a look at current biomechanical thinking and give the Senior Specialist tools and knowledge to work more effectively with the body and skills their senior student has.

    A personal example. I got dinged in a Level II prep clinic last spring for being too low in my stance. I ski "stacked" when I am with a student because that's what I have to do but skiing that way transmits shock into my iffy left hip and it HURTS. So I get a little lower and let my muscles take more of the strain. I guess I would rather deal with the extra fatigue at the end of a day than get jolts of pain all day. Besides, a tall Sailor Jerry and Coke is not only tasty but makes a fine analgesic.

    I am going to devote some time to researching some new technical thinking out on the edges of recreational skiing. Waist steering hasn't found it's way into the mainstream but I discovered last year that a lot of seniors, particularly women, were into Tai Chi and Yoga. Would there be some benefit to a senior to explore that technique. I don't know...yet. I am certain that the find minds here will be a big help. Thanks again for the steerage!...M1
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

  4. #4
    Moderator Snow Sport InstructorSkier Village Coach LiquidFeet's Avatar
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    I am very interested in this topic, as I got a student last year for repeat lessons who started skiing at 63. He was 73 when I got him, and staying mostly on the greens at the bottom of the mountain. His goal was to ski the top. By the end of the season he had done that. I hope I get him back this season. It was a blast working with this fellow. Talk about motivation to improve! His couldn't have been stronger.

  5. #5
    Living in a van down by the river Ski Patrol
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtguide1 View Post
    Hey Superbman! Thanks to much for the direction. Now that I am actually digging into the seniors' scene I am finding tons of clubs all over the world. My "people to call" list is already at 52. I agree that seniors' are terra nova for PSIA but I would add it seems that way for the entire industry. If you browse a copy of SKI magazine you might get the impression it is illegal for people over 25 to ski. I am really looking forward this.

    One of the areas I find lacking in what PSIA material I do have is the adaptation of "acceptable" technique to fit a seniors needs. It is not an "adaptive" teaching model in the traditional sense that PSIA approaches it, but there is a need to take a look at current biomechanical thinking and give the Senior Specialist tools and knowledge to work more effectively with the body and skills their senior student has.

    A personal example. I got dinged in a Level II prep clinic last spring for being too low in my stance. I ski "stacked" when I am with a student because that's what I have to do but skiing that way transmits shock into my iffy left hip and it HURTS. So I get a little lower and let my muscles take more of the strain. I guess I would rather deal with the extra fatigue at the end of a day than get jolts of pain all day. Besides, a tall Sailor Jerry and Coke is not only tasty but makes a fine analgesic.

    I am going to devote some time to researching some new technical thinking out on the edges of recreational skiing. Waist steering hasn't found it's way into the mainstream but I discovered last year that a lot of seniors, particularly women, were into Tai Chi and Yoga. Would there be some benefit to a senior to explore that technique. I don't know...yet. I am certain that the find minds here will be a big help. Thanks again for the steerage!...M1

    Reading this, let me double-down on my advice: get to know John Clendenin and his Clendenin method www.skidoctors.com I have his book and video, never done one of his camps, but I would.

  6. #6
    I could send you an article from my file if I had your e-mail address. Your private message quota is full. CJ

  7. #7
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    Sorry about that! I just cleared my folders out. fire away
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

  8. #8
    Looking for a house Snow Sport Instructor
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    I corresponded with PSIA-W regarding their senior specialist credential maybe seven or eight years ago. They were very helpful supplying information and invited me to attend their spring event where they were conducting the training/credentialing. Unfortunately, I couldn't go. I'll see if I can find the documents they sent. I think PNW also has a credential program.

  9. #9
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    Thnaks Kneale, I have all the docs from PSIA- NW and PSIA-w. Not much going on there. Sort of a hey "Seniors ain't the future" Walmart sort of market mentality. PSIA would rather spend your dues on recruiting your replacement than supporting the growth of current members
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

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