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Thread: Waist Steering and Tai Chi

  1. #21
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    If you look at the waist steering tai chi guy on Tommy's website it is reminiscent of Elvis. Based on that I think CR is right. Rotary movement is all in the waist. I looked at some more Liggety footage and if he is doing that it is tough to spot. I suppose that a leading outside ski would be a give away?
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

  2. #22
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    Contacted Tommy. He'll be dropping in to chat with us soon. Get your questions ready, and keep an eye out for him. Great opportunity to chat directly with the man himself.
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  3. #23
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    Groovy! Will there be some advance notice of his cameo appearance? Don't want to miss it. Thanks CR! Say, maybe a regular guest chat would be educational and some fun? Maybe Nevin from Bumps for Boomers or Superbman's Clendenin? BTW, the Paul Jones I asked you about I think is PJ Jones. FOund some video of him on youtube.
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

  4. #24
    My horse knows his own way home Snow Sport Instructor SMJ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtguide1 View Post
    Nothing sadder than an aging Who fan
    No one knows what it's like to be the sad man.
    I need to be a conqueror, a liberator of my potential, kept prisoner all these years.

  5. #25
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtguide1 View Post
    Groovy! Will there be some advance notice of his cameo appearance? Don't want to miss it. Thanks CR! Say, maybe a regular guest chat would be educational and some fun? Maybe Nevin from Bumps for Boomers or Superbman's Clendenin? BTW, the Paul Jones I asked you about I think is PJ Jones. FOund some video of him on youtube.
    Said it would be sometime today, if he gets the time.

    I like the idea of hosting guest speakers on a regular basis.
    YOUR SKI COACH - Bringing world class skills to the recreational skier

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  6. #26
    Furnished the apartment Skier Village Coach
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    Looking forward to it.

  7. #27
    Hello Friends,

    Thank you for the invite, Rick.

    I read through this thread to get
    an idea of what's being discussed.
    Believe it or not, WaistSteering has
    now been on the chopping block
    for a full 10 years, and I've been
    called every name under the sun.
    Ten years ago, guys like Harold ****
    just called me a quack.

    But at the end of the day, this
    technique is faster in a racecourse.
    And I'm not keeping it a secret.

    I will start by saying what I always
    say: WaistSteering demands a specific
    set of skills developed by an esoteric
    system of physical training. You(alls)
    have mentioned Tai Chi. Yes, Tai Chi
    is a solid reference point.

    However, there is your basic Tai Chi,
    and then there is real Tai Chi.
    Fu Style Tai Chi is the latter. Rick
    came over to Utah many moons ago,
    and had the rare opportunity to work
    with my teacher (see video at 0:51)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uD-Bg6Roc1k
    This drill is a basic waist-turning
    exercise, almost like the Chubby
    Checker Twist.

    Imagine taking classes and learning
    special exercises from a kung fu
    grandmaster. Now imagine practicing
    those exercises for years and years.
    This kind of proper training develops
    a super-human balance, coordination,
    and body control. Put that on skis with
    some basic knowledge of "tipping" and
    you have WaistSteering.

    Where my critics stumble every time is
    by making an appraisal of WaistSteering
    without any such body skills. I can teach
    WaistSteering to anyone; but the ability
    to turn the waist and activate the technique
    is always predicated on the level of physical
    training. If you don't practice the posture,
    breathing and special control of the waist,
    your ability to WaistSteer will be limited.

    That said, everyone can blend WaistSteering
    with their carving style and get faster.
    The reason it's faster is that the two skis
    carve harmoniously together. It feels so
    much smoother than "angulated-leverage"
    turns; and it's more active. With the old way,
    you can only drop your hip down; once it's
    down, you have no where to go. But with
    WaistSteering, you can turn at the top of
    the turn, and if you overturn, you can back
    off to loosen the radius-- and then rotate the
    waist to tighten it again.

    Rick, WaistSteering is like walking. You
    stand on one foot and swing the other foot.
    Like walking, you cannot swing the foot
    you're standing on, which is why WaistSteering
    must bias the inside ski. You want to turn
    the waist and push the outside ski forward,
    like taking a step.

    It is funny how "counter" has diminished from
    the skiing lexicon; but it's still there. Before
    WaistSteering, I only knew counter. I practiced
    javelin turns for 20 years. When I created the
    WaistSteering theory, I began my turns with
    counter, and rotated into the turn. Now I don't
    use counter at all.

    To recap, you need to develop "waist skills"
    in order to WaistSteer effectively. I have
    gobs of exercises I can teach you, but you
    can get started with this one right away:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LcT6C8XpRfA
    As you roll around the circle, try to put
    your mind into your waist.

    I am here to help. Questions ?
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J6be12FSE1Y
    Last edited by TommyK; October 22nd, 2014 at 09:52 AM.

  8. #28
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    Hi Tommy, thanks for dropping in to talk with us, and explain WaistSteering better than I could. I'm sure the Villagers will be in shortly to ask their questions.
    YOUR SKI COACH - Bringing world class skills to the recreational skier

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  9. #29
    Furnished the apartment Skier Village Coach
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    Thanks Tommy. I coach juniors and often I am amazed how little hip control many children have. To have control of your hip movements is very important IMO. I do a lot of coordination exercises, many of them inspired by Feldenkrais and others. I'll have a look at your clips and see if I can find some inspiration.

    About waiststeering, as far as I understand this is how it works:

    quite even pressure between the feet, with a clear focus on the inside.
    engage early in the turn by standing primarily on the inside ski and driving the outside ski forward, the movement is driven from the hip, keeping the balance point somewhere between the skis.
    If you need to turn more, rotate more. I suppose the more turning is because the knee follows and increases edge angle.
    the hips follow the skis so that you are always relatively square to the skis.

    Is that an accurate description?

    I also have some questions.
    Do you use angulation in some way, and if so, is it using waist bending and/or hip leveling?
    What do you do to transition from one turn to the next, extend the inside leg?

  10. #30
    Hi Jamt,

    First a distinction:
    The Tai Chi (or internal martial arts) principles
    make a clear separation between the hips (kua)
    and the waist (yao). If you follow the link above,
    number 5 says,
    "Yao (waist) is like the axle of the chariot, whereas
    Kua (the hips) are like the flags."
    This example is difficult to grasp in analogy, but
    you can understand that the waist is the axle.
    The hips control nothing, as they are controlled
    by power of the waist. ("Flags" might make more
    sense if they were the reflectors on a bicycle
    wheel).

    Your understanding of WaistSteering is pretty
    good, but the movement is driven from the waist,
    not the hip. Think of the spine as the axle, like
    an extension of the waist, or "the core."

    WaistSteering does not use angulation in the
    same way as "angulation leverage turns"
    (aka the old way). I find that very experienced
    racers who have spent an eternity dropping
    their inside hip to angulate have a harder time
    letting go of that habit. WaistSteering uses
    more articulation. With angulation in the old
    way, forces exert on the inside (medial) of
    the outside-leg knee, which is weak.

    WaistSteering puts those nasty forces on the
    outside (lateral) of the inside-leg knee, which
    is practically bulletproof because of the IT Band.
    Essentially, I see WaistSteering as safer because
    the stance is more like an athletic stance, and
    because the outside of the knee can handle
    a great deal more than the inside (medial) knee.

    Transitions come from turning the waist and
    shifting weight onto the new ski (inside ski).
    Because the body is used much more holistically,
    it's really just that simple.

    If any part of my answer is not clear to you,
    please say so. I am happy to try to clarify.

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