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Thread: New Season Resolutions

  1. #11
    My horse knows his own way home Little Tiger's Avatar
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    So true... ask Rick how he ruined my racing...

  2. #12
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    MTG, so true. Carving is not the ticket to the whole mountain, steering is.

    Poor LT when we first skied together was a carve junkie, broad and refined steering skills was not yet in her repertoire. Steep terrain was very scary for her because her comfort zone was found on a cleanly carving edge, but as it got steeper the speeds that produced got too much. We worked on her steering skills and it did wonders for her confidence on steep terrain. Problem was, whe took it into her NASTAR racing too. Prior she would just carve and hold on for dear life. Once she learned to steer she found something she could do to tone it back when it got hairy. It affected her times, until we could get her to stop throwing out the parachute. Eventually did, and went on to get her first platinum.
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  3. #13
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    Ah the good old days! When I was back east the club races were on Sunday and I spent most of satruday on the Nastar course at Cranmore. EICSL races were either there or Wildcat. Sooooo much fun. Then the past couple years I was obsessed with two tracking and it's a hoot, but I can't hold it on steeps for more than 5 or 6 turns before I have to back off. When I started teaching I had to get back into slipping and now I just love sort of painting pictures like finger paints smearing all over the hill

    Superbman pointed me to Clendenin's method as might apply to seniors and that skiing balanced over the uphill ski is going to be interesting and very useful on steeps and bumps. If I can get some one to video it I'll post some up here for you folks to look at.

    Ran into Bud E. on the Snowsports Instructors of the World FB page. He has the same problems with that phone app drill. Just crazy gyrations :/

    Not much snow here yet but there is a wet pulse headed our way later in the week. Fingers crossed! Praise Ullr! We will quaff the holy fluids and dance around the fire in sacred tones...snnnooooooooowwwwww....ommmmmmm
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

  4. #14
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    Not real familiar with Clendenin's uphill ski method, of what I saw have seen it appears to be moving to the old inside ski as you go into the transition, to help control undesirable pivoting. Sound right? If it's more than that, and actually skiing on the inside ski, must be careful with that, especially for the older skier, because the inside leg is the weaker leg to support skier weight and resist turn forces. Because of the extra amount of flex in that leg.
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  5. #15
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    Not entirely sure CR. After a lifetime of focus on being balanced over the downhill ski, I can intellectualize it and still not believe it. You know me. Feeling is believing. Gonna give it a try and see what works. I am reminded of th epost by Gramps about standing tall on the inside relieving his knee pain. Here is my understanding to date....Keep in mind that you know I think "out loud" to try and capture a concept. i am not saying this is how it IS. Just how I understand it.

    The turn is cued by the pole touch. At this point you are balanced and centered on the uphill foot. As the toe of your boot passes the touch point the turn is initiated by an eversion of the down hill foot. I taped half pieces of fire wood to my tennis shoes. In the living room, balanced on one foot, tipping of the foot does pull center downhill a bit. Enough that you have to reestablish balance. Early in the turn the new uphill/inside foot is scraped in toward the downhill foot and center is reestablished on the uphill foot.

    The point as I think I understand it, is to transition and reestablish a balance/center early at the top of the turn that allows you to be in contact with the snow and using that LTE to shape the turn and control speed. The mantra is "Drift, Center,Touch Tip" When IlookatLigety clips, it is a more plausible explanation for the lack of tip lead than the "waist-steering" although it may be a combination of the two. The early establishment of the LTE in his skiing might explain that outside arm thing.

    Early movement to the uphill ski is something I have noticed in the movements of all the old greats back to Killy and Stenmark. such a move raises the line if nothing else,but where arc-to-arc isn't possible, Liggety makes tighter turns with less snow spraying up from his skis. If nothing else that arm thing serves to compact his CoM at transition with a cross-under, so that can't be all bad

    In my own skiing, on the steeps, when I am balanced on that down hill ski, the uphill ski has to ride higher up the hill. even if my thighs are close together, the distance between my feet on the angle of the slope, my feet might actually be 12 inches apart or more. Foot separation on steeps is always problematic. As soon as the transition begins you are de-centered. The turn wants to pull your legs away from each other. Any inclination in the previous turn instantly becomes off centered to the back seat. The inside ski is vulnerable to irregularities in snow density. If you are balanced over the down hill ski, edging on the LTE can cause sudden and possibly upsetting divergence I like to call "yikes! the splits"

    If I am over the uphill ski and the BTE catches a stiff chunk of crud at least the ski's reaction won't be a divergence from my balance/center, but toward it. If I need to because of the terrain/conditions, I can just let that downhill ski hang there without any serious penalty to balance/center. If I am on the downhill ski in the same conditions I have to be athletic enough to fight that uphill ski thru it.

    My brain is now smoking trying to understand without benefit of sensation. I do know that the skiing in their videos looks very controlled and graceful so what the heck? If a stem is needed in a given situation then being able to balance/center on the uphill ski is a valuable tool as well.

    Thoughts?
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

  6. #16
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    More thoughts.It doesn't appear that the differential in flex between uphill and downhill skis is an issue. In CSM, the feet are very close together, not as a contrived "position" but as a natural consequence of the method. The new uphill ski is "scraped into" the new downhill ski with tips very even. This is part of the movement to re-center and balance over the uphill ski. If you are on that uphill ski, you can maintain a tall stance on the inside without much penalty, if any at all in turn shaping. I am going to be giving it a try and will report the results

    They just launched a new website at Clendeninskimethod.com I think the old skidoctors.com will redirect you to the new one. The pictures I believe are all taken on a double black mogul run at Aspen, as usual, the steepness of the terrain is hard to judge in the photos.
    Last edited by mtguide1; November 19th, 2014 at 12:02 PM.
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

  7. #17
    Furnished the apartment Hacski's Avatar
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    My resolution is to get the balance on the inside leg drill on DVD1 under my belt. With four weeks in CO coming up, including two at Breckenridge, half the conditions are in place. With MrsH and her sister along but just them that means the ideal setup for the other half, i.e. I won't be anti-social just spending the time by myself.

    Naturellment I will be extra pleased to achieve more but I don't want to make that a resolution.

  8. #18
    Looking for an apartment Stranger's Avatar
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    The goal this winter is to get in more ski days. The local speed bump opens tomorrow.
    When nothing goes right; go left.

  9. #19
    Resolution # 1- Become thoroughly informed about the drills and exercises that Ms Shiffrin performed in her training that allowed her to achieve the spectacular inside leg recovery in that slalom race last year. I am told that the main drill is called the "Norwegian Drill", possibly named that at the Burke Academy she attended. A video can be found at http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2...m-results.html
    Do any Village members have video or text that explains the training that goes into this kind of recovery move? Is it known by other names?
    Resolution # 2 – Practice all of the above.

  10. #20
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    As far back as Killy (that I know of) and Stenmark for sure, shifting center to the uphill ski at the bottom of a turn is pretty standard fare. great skiers know they have 4 edges to work with. Her spectacular recovery was just routine in many ways. I am trying to think of a spectacular recovery from immediate doom that does not involve the uphill ski.

    Looking at the pictures your post led me to, I think what you see is a CHOICE, not a recovery. In the frame before she lands on her left foot, she is a little aft but nothing in the pic shows her out of control, just shooting past where she wanted to initiate, making her late. At that point she knows (mind you this is really subconscious automatic reaction based on thousands of miles of gates) that trying to recover on the outside ski will put her past and well below the gate and she would still have to re-center uphill anyway.

    Other footage shows her finishing her turns centered over the uphill ski just as she passes each gate She knows she is going to move to the inside anyway, recover on the inside foot, re-center and back on track after the next gate. Brilliant! and automatic.
    Anyone?
    Last edited by mtguide1; December 3rd, 2014 at 08:57 PM.
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

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