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Thread: What To Do When Switching To A Different Radius Ski

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    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    What To Do When Switching To A Different Radius Ski

    How does it affect your skiing, and what do you do about it?
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    My horse knows his own way home Little Tiger's Avatar
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    I struggle most when I switch to a GS ski from a slalom - ie going to a longer radius ski...

    I want the skis to turn NOW and they turn like ....N....O.....W...

    So I want to dive downhill into the next turn and if I do the skis won't be there where I expect...

    What do I do? I make some turns - various radius various degree of turn... try to teach my body what the skis will do... and When going to a GS (rather than say a cheater GS) ski I will add just a little knee angulation to the first few turns until I get up enough speed to turn those puppies(assume I am trying to carve more than steer as I took out a GS ski in the first place)

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    Still unpacking boxes Skier Village Coach TDK's Avatar
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    What Littel Tiger said. Going from a smaller radius to a bigger radius ski causes some balancing issues. For me what helps is using my upper body for active weight transfer to my outside ski while applying hip angulation as soon and early as possible. This way I can tip the ski on edge but still have my CoM in a neutral position. Especially when going to even longer and straighter skiis like SGs you also need a lot of speed so I start off straightlining the slope for a while in order to build turn forces once tipping my skis.
    Carving - let the skis turn you, not you turning your skis

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    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    I think it is a matter of "intent". Ski design has a greater impact in carved turns. less so on foot steered turns. In the softer conditions around home, camber, rocker and flex characteristics are more a factor than side cut. When I do switch from the E88s to the Mantras, I make the first run slipping and doing brush-carve turns just to get my timing in sync.

    In my case though, the change in skis is a matter of intent being affected by conditions rather than by desire to make a particular radius, carved turn.

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    You want some "fun"? Put a GS-radius ski on one foot and a SL-turn radius ski on the other foot. Go skiing. You'll find out if you have any "park-n-ride" habits in a big hurry.

    I found it to be harder when the GS-ski is on the inside as you have to be very proactive in getting that ski out of the way. The other way (with the SL on the inside) is a little easier.

    I've played around with it a few times. It takes a few turns to get the hang of it, but once you do, it really is fun and it's pretty eye-opening experience as to how active you need to be to do it at all.

    Plus you get some great conversations on the lift.

  6. #6
    Still unpacking boxes Skier Village Coach TDK's Avatar
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    Yeah, the ski turn radius really only causes balancing problems when tried to arc edge locked. When brushed the impact is much lower. Actually a GS ski is IMO easier to brush with than an SL ski since the SL ski is more unstable and prone hook up into edge locked carving sooner than the longer straighter GS ski.
    Carving - let the skis turn you, not you turning your skis

  7. #7
    Still unpacking boxes Skier Village Coach TDK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
    You want some "fun"? Put a GS-radius ski on one foot and a SL-turn radius ski on the other foot. Go skiing. You'll find out if you have any "park-n-ride" habits in a big hurry.

    I found it to be harder when the GS-ski is on the inside as you have to be very proactive in getting that ski out of the way. The other way (with the SL on the inside) is a little easier.

    I've played around with it a few times. It takes a few turns to get the hang of it, but once you do, it really is fun and it's pretty eye-opening experience as to how active you need to be to do it at all.

    Plus you get some great conversations on the lift.
    This sounds like a great ide. I have to try it this winter.
    Carving - let the skis turn you, not you turning your skis

  8. #8
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDK View Post
    Yeah, the ski turn radius really only causes balancing problems when tried to arc edge locked. When brushed the impact is much lower. Actually a GS ski is IMO easier to brush with than an SL ski since the SL ski is more unstable and prone hook up into edge locked carving sooner than the longer straighter GS ski.
    Yep, totally agree. I really noticed that when I hopped back on my old straight skis one day.
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    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
    You want some "fun"? Put a GS-radius ski on one foot and a SL-turn radius ski on the other foot. Go skiing. You'll find out if you have any "park-n-ride" habits in a big hurry.

    I found it to be harder when the GS-ski is on the inside as you have to be very proactive in getting that ski out of the way. The other way (with the SL on the inside) is a little easier.

    I've played around with it a few times. It takes a few turns to get the hang of it, but once you do, it really is fun and it's pretty eye-opening experience as to how active you need to be to do it at all.

    Plus you get some great conversations on the lift.
    Think I'd use it as an opportunity to work on my javelin turns.

    So Kevin, what did you do to get the inside ski out of the way when it was the GS ski? I can think of a few ways I would try to see which way I liked best.
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  10. #10
    Furnished the apartment Skier Village Coach
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    Our skis are a tool to cut a pathway into the snow and to smooth over it if we wish. If we're looking for edge hold radius defines our need to act in timing with it's embedded turn shape . I don't get time on narrow skis so my adjustments are lessened. For me it's float and smear or tip or lesser top of surface options with a narrower ski. A person going from a 10 meter ski to a 18 meter ski would be much more of an adjustment. My idea is one would take more patience than the other to feel it's hook up and the direction we allow our CM to differ from our feet.

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