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Thread: What works for me.... tell me what works for you :)

  1. #1
    Still unpacking boxes Skier Village Coach TDK's Avatar
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    Cool What works for me.... tell me what works for you :)

    I have a new ide for a thread that I will force upon you fellow instructors and fellow studnets. Yes, Im both. And today you can be eather one. You choose. I start off with what works for me. Here we go:
    Carving - let the skis turn you, not you turning your skis

  2. #2
    Still unpacking boxes Skier Village Coach TDK's Avatar
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    The Wedge

    I find that the most important things in skiing can be learned from wedging. I attended a ski school camp the other week and was quite surpriced to find that most instructors, young ones in their twenties and below, could not wedge properly. Nor make a proper parallel turn. Nor carve properly. Whats so surpricing about it is that all of this is dead easy. And it all starts with the wedge and the wedge turn.

    Pressure controll. Outside ski pressure. Active weight shift. Angulation. Upper body counter. Upper and lower body separation. Forward stance. Use your skis indirect to make a turn. Turn by using balancing movements.

    Thats all folks.

    T
    Carving - let the skis turn you, not you turning your skis

  3. #3
    Looking for a house Snow Sport Instructor
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    Leads to totally outside-ski dominant folks who don't know what to do with the inside ski. I teach a lot of Level 7 intermediates who can't make a turn without picking up the inside ski because they learned via your approach. They don't know how to move into a turn because they learned to start a turn by moving outside the turn.

  4. #4
    Still unpacking boxes Skier Village Coach TDK's Avatar
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    Thanks for the input Kneale. However, in this thread I thaught each and everyone of us should forcus on what works for us. Not what doesent work for others. Im not really sure if its true what you say above. Or lets say, I know its not but the speculation is valid offourse. Since we are very race oriented we are also very outside ski oriented. We look for performance from the very beginning with juniors and most of the juniors that nailed angulation and outside ski pressure while wedging also became outstanding skiers and racers. If you think about it, you practise the wedge the first year but after that you ski parallel for 5y before your 10y old. During that time theres a lots of time to work on inside ski management as well.

    I know there are many ways of teaching the wedge and how to progress from there into parallel and I know the challanges you are mentioning but thats really not a typical issue for our long term students. I actually teach them never to pick their skis up off the snow but use pressure distribution insted. Picking the inside ski up to release it from its edge and redirect it into the turn rushes the turn, puts their hips to the outside which causes hip and upper body rotation and has much to do with fear. I teach them to not be afraid of the fall line and to trust proper movements and outside ski pressure.
    Carving - let the skis turn you, not you turning your skis

  5. #5
    Home Sweet Home Skier Village Coach mastersracer's Avatar
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    I've been playing with getting major angles as the conditions here (no new snow in two weeks until today) have kind of dictated skiing on packed trails. The main thing I had to do was get my inside leg out of the way. I needed a gross displacement of the inside ski so I simply focused on lifting my foot as though I was trying to raise it over an obstacle. My inside ski remained on the snow and provided a bit of feedback and balance, but almost all of my pressure was on the outside ski. The movement was similar to standing and stepping onto a box two steps high. Of course because I was turning, the direction of motion of the inside knee was into the turn but remained in a plane parallel to my outside leg. Rather than 'riding a bike' down the hill (an apparently common way of describing the sensation of flexing the inside leg) I was 'stepping up' on each turn. The range of motion was far more than a pedal stroke as I was getting my derriere very close to the snow and I really needed the inside leg out of the way. I didn't think about pulling the foot back or tipping the inside ski or anything like that. Just massive inside leg retraction.

    What I experienced was the sensation of a huge steps with the changes in extension and flexion of my legs. My hips were pretty low during transitions with both legs flexed. My 'step' by flexing the outside leg and slightly extending the inside leg to the point I was evenly flexed. I'd then change edges and fairly quickly extend the new outside leg while flexing the new inside to get the space for the big angles. The sensation right after transition was that I was pushing my upper body towards the inside of the turn while letting myself fall that way by flexing my inside leg.

    It was fun to get the huge angles and quite exciting; I was on Bent Chetlers with a 123 mm waist. This has given me the physical memory of what it is like to get Ligety like edge angles that I hope to bring into my racing. I suspect that despite two legged skiing being faster on a glide, that I am giving away time by not having the most efficient angles to direct more of my momentum forward for speed.

  6. #6
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    Teaching people how to add skid angle to their turns provides them with a sense of control over their speed which allows them to cast their inhibitions with speed and the falline to the wind. In essence, teaching people how to go slow gives them the confidence to go fast. I've had stunning success with this teaching strategy.
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    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
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    MR, any video of your new angles?
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  8. #8
    Home Sweet Home Skier Village Coach mastersracer's Avatar
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    Not at this time, CR. I don't have a videographer at the moment. It has been fun playing on the harder snow and finding what works. Tomorrow I may ski with snowfan. Maybe I can get him to take some video with my phone.

  9. #9
    Still unpacking boxes Skier Village Coach TDK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach Rick View Post
    Teaching people how to add skid angle to their turns provides them with a sense of control over their speed which allows them to cast their inhibitions with speed and the falline to the wind. In essence, teaching people how to go slow gives them the confidence to go fast. I've had stunning success with this teaching strategy.
    Wow, nice posting Rick. Good to hear that you have had success with that strategy because so many skiers skip that stage mainly because they think its not a cool thing to do. I think its the coolest thing, driving slowly in my Ferrari and letting all sorts of junk overtake me. Figuratively speaking offcourse. Not even ski instructors stick to this protocoll.
    Carving - let the skis turn you, not you turning your skis

  10. #10
    Still unpacking boxes Skier Village Coach TDK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mastersracer View Post
    I've been playing with getting major angles as the conditions here (no new snow in two weeks until today) have kind of dictated skiing on packed trails. The main thing I had to do was get my inside leg out of the way. I needed a gross displacement of the inside ski so I simply focused on lifting my foot as though I was trying to raise it over an obstacle. My inside ski remained on the snow and provided a bit of feedback and balance, but almost all of my pressure was on the outside ski. The movement was similar to standing and stepping onto a box two steps high. Of course because I was turning, the direction of motion of the inside knee was into the turn but remained in a plane parallel to my outside leg. Rather than 'riding a bike' down the hill (an apparently common way of describing the sensation of flexing the inside leg) I was 'stepping up' on each turn. The range of motion was far more than a pedal stroke as I was getting my derriere very close to the snow and I really needed the inside leg out of the way. I didn't think about pulling the foot back or tipping the inside ski or anything like that. Just massive inside leg retraction.

    What I experienced was the sensation of a huge steps with the changes in extension and flexion of my legs. My hips were pretty low during transitions with both legs flexed. My 'step' by flexing the outside leg and slightly extending the inside leg to the point I was evenly flexed. I'd then change edges and fairly quickly extend the new outside leg while flexing the new inside to get the space for the big angles. The sensation right after transition was that I was pushing my upper body towards the inside of the turn while letting myself fall that way by flexing my inside leg.

    It was fun to get the huge angles and quite exciting; I was on Bent Chetlers with a 123 mm waist. This has given me the physical memory of what it is like to get Ligety like edge angles that I hope to bring into my racing. I suspect that despite two legged skiing being faster on a glide, that I am giving away time by not having the most efficient angles to direct more of my momentum forward for speed.
    Sounds like really fast skiing. I agree, we need a video. Its a good strategy to take only one focus point thats a physical movement and let everything else fall into place. One thing thou, such big angles on hard pack with a 123mm waist ski?
    Carving - let the skis turn you, not you turning your skis

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