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Thread: The new Wintersteiger TrimJet at A Racer's Edge

  1. #1
    Home Sweet Home Skier Village Coach mastersracer's Avatar
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    The new Wintersteiger TrimJet at A Racer's Edge



    This is a video I took with my phone.

    This beauty will put a perfect edge on your skis (or board) to exacting standards. When the machine is set for 1 degree base and a 2 degree side bevels, you know that is what you are getting. That it is robotic helps us get more skis done better and faster than when we used the old GrindRite. Now the GrindRite (a belt based edger) is relegated to sidewall trimming.

    http://www.wintersteiger.com/en/Spor...ing/24-Trimjet



    This is someone else's video but is nice and clear. You can see how the drive wheels (the tan rubber wheels) grab the ski, tilt and drive the ski down and forward along the bearings. The ceramic discs (the blue and gray 'bowls') spin up after contacting the ski in both the side and base edge position. Coolant is sprayed into the discs and cools the disks and edges.

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    Looking for an apartment Stranger's Avatar
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    Better skiing through robotics.

    There is a lot to be said for a 10" mill bastard file and a P-Tex stick.
    When nothing goes right; go left.

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    Home Sweet Home Skier Village Coach mastersracer's Avatar
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    We have files and P-Tex in the shop, too. It comes down to excellent tunes at a reasonable cost for a shop's customers. We can still do a hand tune that may surpass what the TrimJet will do, but not for the same price.

    This is the same machine that ski makers use to finish their new product for sale. What we can do better with this machine is work on a ski that has stabilized rather than still curing fresh out of a press.

    I'd happily use this machine to prepare my race skis and put any hand finish that I want on them.

  4. #4
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    How much does a machine like that cost? How does it stay out of the base material when it cuts the base angle? Do you always cut the sidewalls back before you put them in there?
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

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    Home Sweet Home Skier Village Coach mastersracer's Avatar
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    Thousands. I use it, not pay for it, so I don't know exactly how many.

    It does get into the base a touch. The skis that are put in the machine are already ground to be flat so that the base is not affected much. Because of the accuracy of the machine, it is important to achieve a flat base prior to edging. After the edge grind, the ski is run over the stone again to restore structure to the base where it may have been abraded by the discs.

    We do trim the sidewall back. Sidewall material, just like base material affects the depth of the cut. The GrindRite belt edger has found a new life as a sidewall tool. It is set for a degree above the trimjet setting and clears away any sidewall that will interfere with discs.

    We can do our race tunes with the trimjet and hand finish them. 'Benchmark Tunes' include a grind, trimjet treatment and wax. The finish is so smooth that only a bit of gummi is necessary to take the extreme sharpness down. For our clients, there is such a things as too sharp.

    Consider that for the same price they were paying for a GrindRite tune, our customers are getting a precision tune with the trimjet. The GrindRite is a fully manual belt abrasive machine with somewhat rudimentary adjustments and lots of room for error. Even a skilled GrindRite operator can only provide an approximation of a specific bevel angle. I calibrate the trimjet every week and find it holds it settings extremely accurately. I can assure an edge bevel angle on a ski within .1 degree of what is desired.

    Note that Wintersteiger designs and provides equipment for WC ski service utilizing the same disc technology. http://www.wintersteiger.com/en/Spor...ing/26-Trim-NC

    If you are interested, I'll take some before and after photos of a ski that has been used in the machine. It is impressive what it can do.

  6. #6
    Looking for a house mtguide1's Avatar
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    MR, I was just curious about how the stones react to plastics on sidewall or base. IF they deflect the stones or if the stones gum up with plastic.

    When I was running the shop I started keeping records of their tune ups. Every time they came in I would add less than a tenth degree on the base angle just to be sure to stay out of the bases. I had one guy that kept bringing is skis in every 2-3 weeks and the bases were cut back from the edge noticeably. I asked him to bring in the tool he was using to "touch" up his skis 4 days a week. It was one of those plastic doo dads with a file in it. arrrrrg******! I'd love to have that machine though! Best go buy a lottery ticket.
    "If you are lucky enough to be on the mountain.....You are lucky enough"

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    Home Sweet Home Skier Village Coach mastersracer's Avatar
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    The sidewall doesn't affect the disc other than to keep it from full contact with the metal edge. The disc doesn't get gummed up. Ditto with the P-Tex it contacts. If the disc never contacted metal during a pass, I suppose it might get gummed up, but since it is cooled with liquid, the ski and disc dont' get hot so any plastic removed seems to be removed through abrasion, not melting.

  8. #8
    Interesting that the bowls seem to engage before the yellow guide wheels do.

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    Home Sweet Home Skier Village Coach mastersracer's Avatar
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    One set of guide wheels is engaged when the discs engage. The other set engages when there is ski there to engage. It was a little disconcerting at first, but the way the ski is held down by only one pair of wheels insures that the ski is properly aligned the whole time. The guide wheels have some rocker to them so that they push forward and down simultaneously. They tip one way for the left to right pass and the other way for the return pass.

  10. #10
    Yeh, I see that. To me that control method means the bowl position has to be actively encoded (optical sensor? actuator tracking?) and compared to that of the guide wheels, so I was geeking out over that.

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