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Thread: Tipping the foot inside the boot is actually twisting at the ancle!

  1. #11
    I have my own seat in the pub Bushido Princess's Avatar
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    I don't know that I can analyze exactly what is happening, just what I feel. I try to roll onto my little toe edge foot pad to initiate a turn. What each of my bones is doing, I don't really know. But I feel the pressure on my foot. And when I start the turn I tell myself to feel my little toe edge foot pad engage to tip the inside ski. Sometimes I have pain in my right knee though and back but that is not just from skiing. I have it all the time. I also have other physical problems that I am constantly having to work on. But I am trying to do the drills like Rick teaches. I learned about the little toe edge initiation from a John Clendenin book. I also pressure the outside ski at the very very top of the turn, like pressing down on it. Then I scrape in the inside ski as I tip onto its little toe edge.

  2. #12
    Still unpacking boxes Skier Village Coach TDK's Avatar
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    BP - I think I know what you mean. Tipping your foot inside a snugg fitting boot adds pressure to the outside/inside of your underfoot more than allows for actual physical movement. Sorry to hear about your back problems. Be carefull out there.
    Carving - let the skis turn you, not you turning your skis

  3. #13
    Still unpacking boxes Skier Village Coach TDK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jamt View Post
    He is not pushing his knee in that picture.

    In general, there are lots of racers with movement patterns that are not healthy.

    Functional movements, what does it mean? It depends on the function.
    If the function is to get the best possible time compromised back positions and knee-pushing may be acceptable, but if the function is body health, it is not.

    If your back or knees ever hurt after a ski day, chances are big that your movement patterns are not in line with the latter function.
    Bode is a recent example of what repeated compromised back positions can do to your back.

    Strength coaches are very concerned if the knee goes inside when squatting, not everyone seems to be concerned about that in skiing, although it is the same type of loading on the body.
    I dont necessarily think that its the movement patterns that are unhealthy. Its taking movementpatterns and speed to their extremes that are causing the very unhealthy atmosphere of ski racing. Ted told me that "all" wc skiers have back problems himself included. Not a Bode specific thing. I think that it could be said that not being skilled or fit enough to use the movementpatterns correctly is causing the danger at the contemporary level. Also, more subtle movements at moderate speeds can be considered as safe as skiing ever can get.

    IMO you have two different situations when skiing arc to arc in a racing kind of mode. Short turns down the fall line where your hips and torso remains stable in the fall line and your skis cross back and forth from side to side. Think a flush or just a quick stand alone turn without much offset. Here you tip using only your feet and your leggs are working hard from a low position. Forces never get very big here. Or wider across the hill type turns where you need to offset your hips into the turn and back up the massive pressure build up by aligning your hips over your feet in a proper way. Any thaughts?
    Carving - let the skis turn you, not you turning your skis

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