Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 11 to 20 of 20

Thread: Balance, an outcome more than a skill?

  1. #11
    Looking for a house Snow Sport Instructor
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    I live in Breckenridge
    Posts
    654
    Quote Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
    First thing I look at is ski performance.
    Second thing I look at is body performance.

    After that, it's terrain and conditions.

    Then it's equipment.

  2. #12
    Looking for an apartment Snow Sport Instructor
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Near the Great Hill
    Posts
    337
    Okay, to completely reverse things. (Inspired by a level 5-6 lesson I taught last night)

    The thing about balance is it creates the ability to utilize the other skills. I once heard it explained as "balance provides the ability to effectively utilize any skill with either ski at any time."

    So one could say getting in balance is a cause and being able to utilize a skill, such as rotary movements, is an effect.

    What I think really helps is to have the ability to look at things from more than one angle. For example -- Pressure control in various planes affects balance. Balance affects the ability to utilize rotary and edging movements.



    On the what to look at thing. The way I was taught to do Movement Analysis is --

    1. Take a quick look at the whole picture.
    2. Look at what the skies are doing on the snow.
    3. Work up from there, i.e., look at skis, then boots, then knees, then hips, then torso, then shoulders, than head and arms.

  3. #13
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    City Above The Clouds, Colorado
    Posts
    3,834
    Quote Originally Posted by learn2turn View Post

    Okay, to completely reverse things. (Inspired by a level 5-6 lesson I taught last night)

    The thing about balance is it creates the ability to utilize the other skills. I once heard it explained as "balance provides the ability to effectively utilize any skill with either ski at any time."
    L2T, shshshsh. Don't tell everybody! I've got a great business going selling DVDs to people who don't have access to this knowledge.
    YOUR SKI COACH - Bringing world class skills to the recreational skier

    * Instructional DVDs * Technical Articles * On Hill Coaching

    www.YourSkiCoach.com

  4. #14
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    City Above The Clouds, Colorado
    Posts
    3,834
    Quote Originally Posted by learn2turn View Post
    On the what to look at thing. The way I was taught to do Movement Analysis is --

    1. Take a quick look at the whole picture.
    2. Look at what the skies are doing on the snow.
    3. Work up from there, i.e., look at skis, then boots, then knees, then hips, then torso, then shoulders, than head and arms.
    That's a good, systematic method. After so many years of doing MA, and when I think about how I actually do it in real life coaching, I tend to take a more freehand approach. I just look at the skiing, big picture fashion, and what I need to focus on jumps out at me in an instant. If they're tail tossing, rotating, in the back seat, leaning in, check turning, windshield wipering, skiing crunched up, skiing stiff, it all just screams to me like a child in distress, and I know immediately what to do.

    Give it a try. Take a broad look at the whole package and leave your mind clear, not trying to focus on any one particular thing. Just let the skiing talk to you. Then go back and do the systematic approach, and see if there was anything you actually missed. You might surprise yourself. The systematic approach is a great way for starting out, but in time it can be discarded. Learning to coach is like learning to ski; in the beginning you have to think it through, step by step, move by move, piece by piece to make each turn or transition. After some time we get to the point all the intense thinking is no longer needed, it's relegated to muscle memory, and we just ski. Same thing with coaching.
    YOUR SKI COACH - Bringing world class skills to the recreational skier

    * Instructional DVDs * Technical Articles * On Hill Coaching

    www.YourSkiCoach.com

  5. #15
    Looking for a house Snow Sport Instructor
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    I live in Breckenridge
    Posts
    654
    To practice, watch skiers while you're on the lift. Try to figure out what might improve their skiing and how you'd address the changes.

  6. #16
    Looking for an apartment Snow Sport Instructor
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Near the Great Hill
    Posts
    337
    Quote Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
    To practice, watch skiers while you're on the lift. Try to figure out what might improve their skiing and how you'd address the changes.
    I do that all the time. My big confession as a vet ski instructor is I have a fear of coming up with a lesson plan on the spot. That's because I teach mostly seasonal programs and might only teach 1/2 dozen line up lines a year. I always do okay but I'm always like what if I can't think of something to do with these people? So I watch people on the list all the time and say to myself what could I come up with in two minutes that would be a good hour lesson for that skier?

    Another thing I did when I was studying for my LII teaching exam is I got the cards for skier profiles and skier situations for the creative teaching module, computed all the combinations in Excel, randomized the order and then went through a few of them each day while riding the train to work every day. So for profile X and skier problem Y, what lesson would I give? The spreadsheet read something like --

    5 year old kid who won't stop crying -- Mom wants him doing wedge turns on green trails by 10:30AM so they can ski together the rest of the day.
    Overweight housewife on Valium -- Wants to huck frozen waterfalls in the woods without face planting into a tree.
    22 year old fashion model -- needs a buddy for tequila shooters in the bar.
    11 year old bratty kid with rich day -- need to babysitter for video games in the lodge but tad will tip $200/hour.

    (Maybe someone gave me the wrong cards ???)

    -l2t

  7. #17
    Looking for a house Snow Sport Instructor
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    I live in Breckenridge
    Posts
    654
    There will always be a situation that isn't "in the cards." I used to "teach" lessons in the car on my way to the ski hill, picking a situation and then verbally "presenting". Good thing it was a lonely ride on vacant rural roads.

  8. #18
    I have my own seat in the pub Skier Village Coach Coach Rick's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    City Above The Clouds, Colorado
    Posts
    3,834
    Quote Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post
    To practice, watch skiers while you're on the lift. Try to figure out what might improve their skiing and how you'd address the changes.
    Kneale, I do that constantly. Can't stop, can't help myself. Hi, my name is Rick, I"m an MAaholic.
    YOUR SKI COACH - Bringing world class skills to the recreational skier

    * Instructional DVDs * Technical Articles * On Hill Coaching

    www.YourSkiCoach.com

  9. #19
    My horse knows his own way home Snow Sport Instructor SMJ's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Central MA
    Posts
    2,471
    Blog Entries
    7
    There's a lift at my mountain that runs along a steep wide green trail. It's a slow non-detachable quad. I use it during lessons to point skiers out to my students and discuss what they're doing. Sometimes it's a very effective teaching tool. Other times the student is totally disinterested or can't understand what I'm pointing at and describing.
    I need to be a conqueror, a liberator of my potential, kept prisoner all these years.

  10. #20
    Looking for an apartment Snow Sport Instructor
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Near the Great Hill
    Posts
    337
    Quote Originally Posted by Coach Rick View Post
    That's a good, systematic method. After so many years of doing MA, and when I think about how I actually do it in real life coaching, I tend to take a more freehand approach. ...
    Jazz musician Charlie Parker once said "Master your instrument; master the music; then forget all that crap and just play."

    I think you've reached the Charlie Parker level of coaching.

    -l2t

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •