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Thread: Thigh burn

  1. #11
    Looking for a house Snow Sport Instructor
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    Make a picture in your head. To expand on MR's points: next time you're in your boots with skis on, stand up straight on flat ground and slowly rock back and forth. Notice how the pressures on the bottoms of your feet move as you rock forward and back. Also take note of contact with the boot cuff changing. Make the oscillations gradually smaller and smaller until you are standing with equal pressure along the bottoms of both feet. That is, feel equal pressure at the balls of your feet and at the heels. Next, flex your ankles slightly. This will bring your shins into contact with the tongues of the boots, but you'll still feel equal pressures along the bottoms of the feet. This is your most stable position, something you want to strive to feel whenever sliding. Now, while standing in this position on flat ground, picture in your head the ground ahead of you falling away like on a ski slope. Imagine how your body wants to react to this change and what you have to do to maintain the contact points between your body and your boots to remain effectively stable.

  2. #12
    I have my own seat in the pub Bushido Princess's Avatar
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    Smyke, one thing to remember as well is where you hands are. In skiing, your hand position is just as important as your leg and body position. I don't want you to be too overwhelmed with information overload so I will try to keep it simple. Pretend you are serving a tray of coffee to everyone on the mountain. Hold your pretend tray in front of you so that you don't spill any coffee. Don't hold it so stiffly that your arms ache, just hold it as if you were actually serving coffee on a tray. You can even hold your poles as if they were a tray, tips in one hand and handles in the other and make sure that no matter what you do, you never spill your tray. This will keep your hands in a nice forward position.

    If you have what we call "lazy hands" and your hands end up behind you when you ski, most beginners do this, you will be in the back seat. Having your hands forward, as if carrying a tray, will help you stay more forward on your skis.

    If you find that you are going faster than you feel comfortable with, don't lean back. Simply make more turns and turns that go all the way that end slightly uphill. This is the best way to control speed. If you lean back you lose control of your skis. If you ski more forward, you gain control of your skis. But no matter what, always keep your hands in front of you. This will really help.

    As far as why the new skis are feeling harder for you, my guess is shorter skis have shorter tails. If you are sitting on your tails, the shorter tails will be harder to sit on. But the shorter newer skis, when skied properly, will give you much more control than the old long ones and will be much easier for you to make turns with.

    As far as keeping your shin on the cuffs of your boots, I liked to tell students, the year that I taught, that I was giving them two $100.00 bills and that they were to put one in the front cuff of each boot. And that in order for them to not lose them they had to keep their shins in contact with the cuffs. If they lost their "boot money" they would owe me double at the end of the lesson. But keeping the shins gently in contact with the front cuffs with relaxed bent knee will keep you in a forward position.

    Remember skiing is about relaxing. So as you learn these new positions be as relaxed as you can. You might be skiing with a very tight stance and keeping your body pretty stiff if I am guessing correctly. Most beginners do. That will make your muscles burn as well.
    Last edited by Bushido Princess; March 19th, 2015 at 08:15 AM.

  3. #13
    Just passing through
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    I think I have that picture in my head now KB. Thank you.

    BP, interesting that you mention trays. Last time out I saw a bunch of kids walking around with trays in their hands and I was wondering why. Now it all makes sense.

  4. #14
    I have my own seat in the pub Bushido Princess's Avatar
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    That's funny. I wonder if they were doing the drill with actual trays! The last time kids had cafeteria trays on the mountain at Roundtop they got busted for sledding on them like with dining hall trays in college.

    Keep us posted on how it's all working out for you. We are really glad to be able to help you.

  5. #15
    Just passing through
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    I have not seen the kids skiing with trays but they all had skis on and the instructor was handing the trays out on top of the mountain.

  6. #16
    It still baffles me that it started happening with new skis with everything else being the same.
    thanks

  7. #17
    Thank you LiquidFeet for sharing this information.

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